Management of Meloidogyne Species in Tomato Cultivation Using Compost in Northern Guinea Savanna of Nigeria

Authors

  • J Bulus
  • M Joshua
  • C Okolo
  • E D Shamaki
  • B D Kashina
  • O Alabi
  • P S Chindo

Keywords:

Root knot, Meloidogyne incognita, compost, tomato, management

Abstract

The research work determines the effectiveness of an integrated compost formed from plants and animal waste in the management of Meloidogyne incognita causing root knots and its effect on growth and yield of tomato. Rice husk and sawdust were separately mixed with cow dung and poultry manure in the ratio of 3:2:1 and buried in a pit for 3 months for proper decomposition. Total of 6 treatments at varying rates of the two composts type were compared with Furadan and inorganic fertilizer and a non-treated plot served as the control. The treatments were laid in a Randomized Complete Block Design replicated 4 times. Two experiments were conducted at different locations. Fields were prepared based on the agronomic practices in tomato cultivation. A week after the different treatments were incorporated into the soil, 3 weeks old tomato seedlings (Roma VF variety) were transplanted and a week later data on plant height, number of leaves and number of branches were measured and recorded up to the 9 th week after transplanting which ends the experiment. At maturity, tomato fruits were collected and weigh per plot on weekly bases. At the end of the experiment fresh and dry root weight, number of second stage juvenile from the soil and root, root gall index and number of egg mass were determined and recorded. Results showed that all compost treated tomato gave significantly higher plant height, number of leaves, number of branches and fresh weight compared with the nontreated tomato. Dry root weight of tomato treated with composts were not significantly higher when compared with the non-treated tomato. Number of second stage juvenile in the soil and roots were significantly reduced by the compost treatment in the two locations. Gall score, number of egg mass were not significantly reduced by compost treatments. Rice husk compost at RH5 gave the highest yield from the locations (5839.27-5041.67 kg/ha) while the non-treated tomato plants gave the lowest yield from the two locations (1887.00-2192.67 kg/ha). Fruit yield was negatively correlated with number of Meloidogyne incognita species in tomato roots. Compost from these experiments reduces the second larval stage of Meloidogyne incognita in the roots and soil and improves plant height, number of leaves, number of branches and yield of tomato plants. Farmers are advice to integrate compost with inorganic fertilizer as a means of controlling root knot and enhanced yield of tomato. 

Author Biographies

J Bulus

Department of Crop Protection,
Faculty of Agriculture
Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria

M Joshua

Department of Crop Protection,
Faculty of Agriculture
Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria

C Okolo

Federal College of Freshwater Fishes Technology
New-Bussa,
Niger state, Nigeria.

E D Shamaki

Federal College of Freshwater Fishes Technology
New-Bussa,
Niger state, Nigeria.

B D Kashina

Department of Crop Protection,
Faculty of Agriculture
Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria

O Alabi

Department of Crop Protection,
Faculty of Agriculture
Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria

P S Chindo

Department of Crop Protection,
Faculty of Agriculture
Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria

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Published

2022-05-09

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Section

Articles